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QR Codes – Interactive Learning Walls

This was mentioned in Tuesday’s post on Audio Files, however there are so many more ways to make your displays and Learning Walls interactive and I wanted to spend some time on the walls of the classroom.  I have had some success with response to feedback using QR codes in students that previously were uninvolved in the learning experience. Generally it has been was great way of getting classes excited about coming to the lesson if only to see which videos/articles I had put up this month and which of their video commentaries had made it to the board

More Information

  1. For subject displays you can link to news items, videos and photos on the internet
  2. A video file – of a book review, summary by a student of a related research project, interviews of students/by students
  3. Audio files – commentary on the display (like in a museum), example of music, podcast
  4. Links to student blogs

Feedback

  1. Teacher assessment in video or audio format
  2. Peer assessment – as a plenary students can create their own QR codes with feedback
  3. Example exam questions on the topic
  4. Revision websites specialising in the area that the student is weak in (according to this particular piece of work)

Making progress

  1. With model answers you can provide a commentary of why each part was important to include, alternative, valid points that could have been included
  2. Two stars and a wish as text QR codes.
  3. Links to forums to discuss work/ideas/learning

QR Codes – Games

This one will take a little time to set up – but it will keep them occupied for hours.

1. Essentially you make 9 QR codes that are coded questions of some kind in the 3 x 3 format of a noughts and crosses square.

2.   As in the traditional noughts and crosses format, they choose a square to mark off as a O or X.  However, first they have to work out the answer to the questions coded in the QR code in that square.  If they get it right, they win that square, if they don’t they have to wait until their next go before they can try again.

3.  The first person to win three squares in a line, wins.

4.  I give my classes post it notes for them to draw their O’s and X’s on when they win a square so that the sheet can be reused.

Some lesson ideas:

*   spellings – with audio recordings of the word you want them to spell

*   maths questions (simple addition and subtraction; solving equations; etc)

*   keyword definitions

*   To make the makaton sign for a word/phrase (SEN)

QR Codes – Treasure Hunts

These do take some time to set up, but they can be reused in so many different ways:

  • Rewards
  • Race to see who can complete the questions first
  • Assessing understanding
  • In groups students can design a series of questions at the end of one lesson as a plenary for other groups to complete as a starter next lesson.
  • Questions to think about
  • Collect objects for the next task (ie pieces of a jigsaw to make a picture they have to annotate, equipment they need for an experiment, definitions for keywords, task cards, answers to exam questions)
  1. Decide on your  goal (ie, where you want them to end up at)
  2. Create the clues – these can be audio/picture/text
  3. Convert them into QR codes (see previous posts on how to create links to audio, pictures are the same as audio, and you can also link to videos on third party sites like Facebook)
  4. Students then go around the classroom/school (depending on how big you want to make it) and solve the clues.  When scanned, the clue can be:

*  A question to answer

*  A phonic to repeat

*  An equation to solve

*  A picture to take

*  A clue to the next location

For big groups you may want to have them start in different locations – make sure you have enough for each group if you are providing objects to collect.